Tippy Tappy Pet Nails


Just the words "nail trimming" makes me cringe. It is an arduous process and emotionally torturous for Athena. I have tried numerous methods of making the nail trimming process for Athena to be as comfortable as possible. The only thing that does make the whole process tolerable is that she knows there are yummies at the end. *insert facepalm emoji* While nail trimming is our least favorite thing to do, it is necessary for the health of our fur babies.


Imagine not trimming your toenails and wearing closed-toe shoes. It doesn't feel good, and it's pretty painful. Pain is what your pet feels when their nails are too long tippy tapping on your wooden or tile floors. The pain radiates against the nail beds, into their toe joints, up to their legs and hips. Your dog's weight distribution is compromised in the long run, making your pet susceptible to other injuries. Leaving your pet's nails unattended for too long can tear, twist, split, or curve under and grow into their paw pads. Your pet may need veterinarian care at this point, and that won't be a cheap bill to pay!


A rule of thumb for a proper nail length for your pet is that the nail should not touch the ground. If you can hear the tippy tappy on the floor, it's time for a nail trim! There are a few tools out there you can choose for nail trimming. Depending on your pet's nail type may depend on the suitable device for your pet. For example, Athena has dark and dense nails, so it is difficult to determine her quicks. I found that a grinder works best for her nail type as I can monitor more carefully if I've reached her quicks. Ask your vet or groomer for advice on the best nail tool to use for your pet.


Speaking of quicks, these are the nerve and vein endings of the nail. If you cut too short and your pet begins to bleed, you've nicked the quick. But don't panic; you can use a pinch of flour to stop the bleeding or a clean cotton ball with a bit of peroxide. (Please don't use alcohol! Ouch!) If your pet's nails are like Athena's, keep an eye for a tiny black dot in the center of the nail. That is an indicator that you have come close to the quick. The more often and consistently you trim your pet’s nails the shorter and faster their quicks recede and the more nail you can trim.


If your pet is a happy jumper, long nails are sharp and cause painful scratches not just on other pets but people too. As a pet sitter, I own my fair share of painful scars on my arms, legs,

back, and if I'm not careful, my neck and face too! Playtime turns into no-fun time. Deep scratches can quickly become infected from the dirt and bacteria underneath your pet's nails, and that is a pricey human doctor visit too!